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dc.contributor.authorFromille, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jonathan
dc.dateDecember 22, 2014
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-03T15:42:54Z
dc.date.available2016-08-03T15:42:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-22
dc.identifier.citationFromille, Samuel, and Jonathan Phillips. "Super dielectric materials." Materials 7.12 (2014): 8197-8212.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/49526
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma7128197en_US
dc.description.abstractEvidence is provided here that a class of materials with dielectric constants greater than 10⁵ at low frequency (<10¯² Hz), herein called super dielectric materials (SDM), can be generated readily from common, inexpensive materials. Specifically it is demonstrated that high surface area alumina powders, loaded to the incipient wetness point with a solution of boric acid dissolved in water, have dielectric constants, near 0 Hz, greater than 4 × 10⁸ in all cases, a remarkable increase over the best dielectric constants previously measured for energy storage capabilities, ca. 1 × 10⁴. It is postulated that any porous, electrically insulating material (e.g., high surface area powders of silica, titania, etc.), filled with a liquid containing a high concentration of ionic species will potentially be an SDM. Capacitors created with the first generated SDM dielectrics (alumina with boric acid solution), herein called New Paradigm Super (NPS) capacitors display typical electrostatic capacitive behavior, such as increasing capacitance with decreasing thickness, and can be cycled, but are limited to a maximum effective operating voltage of about 0.8 V. A simple theory is presented: Water containing relatively high concentrations of dissolved ions saturates all, or virtually all, the pores (average diameter 500 Å) of the alumina. In an applied field the positive ionic species migrate to the cathode end, and the negative ions to the anode end of each drop. This creates giant dipoles with high charge, hence leading to high dielectric constant behavior. At about 0.8 V, water begins to break down, creating enough ionic species to “short” the individual water droplets. Potentially NPS capacitor stacks can surpass “supercapacitors” in volumetric energy density.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEnergy Expeditionary Office of the US Marine Corporationen_US
dc.format.extent16 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleSuper Dielectric Materialsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPhysicsen_US
dc.subject.authorcapacitoren_US
dc.subject.authordielectricen_US
dc.subject.authorenergyen_US
dc.description.funderEnergy Expeditionary Office of the US Marine Corporationen_US


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