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dc.contributor.advisorLawson, Letitia L.
dc.contributor.authorStarace, Gregory.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:43:56Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5021
dc.description.abstractIn order to understand variation in post-transition levels of democracy, this thesis undertakes a comparative case study of Mali and Niger. Despite similarities, Mali had substantially more success with democratization than Niger. This thesis employs a detailed process tracing of the decisions of political and civil society leaders in Mali and Niger at critical junctures when democratic institutions were put to the test to evaluate the empirical validity of existing explanations. It seeks to validate (or invalidate) the causal mechanisms linking political culture and democratic success. The evidence however, suggests something different. There is a remarkable parallel in the behavior of political and civil actors in the two countries, which invalidates the hypotheses. The most likely alternative explanation is the role of key individuals. The analysis indicates that "good guys" in Mali may have had a part in encouraging the forthright application of the rule of law, as they accepted rulings that ran counter to their agendas, whereas "bad guys" in Niger who, to varying degrees, engaged in actions that were arguably illegal,l as they ran counter to the respective Niger constitutions, may have had a part in encouraging the abandonment of the rule of law.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/disparityindemoc109455021
dc.format.extentxii, 53 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDemocracyen_US
dc.subject.lcshCivil societyen_US
dc.subject.lcshRule of lawen_US
dc.titleDisparity in democracies a comparative case study of Mali and Nigeren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMensch, Eugene M. II
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentSecurity Studies
dc.description.serviceUS Marine Corps (USMC) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclc698377654
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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