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dc.contributor.advisorFreeman, Michael
dc.contributor.authorVickers, Jeremy S.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:43:57Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:43:57Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5022
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSince 2006, the gang-related homicide rate in Salinas, California, has quadrupled. As of 2009, the homicide rate associated with gang activity far exceeds that of much larger California cities such as San Francisco, San Jose, and even Los Angeles. This thesis examines this negative trend through the lens of counterinsurgency, since gangs exhibit many similarities, in structure and tactics, to insurgent groups. Accordingly, this thesis capitalizes on the diverse academic theories available to the study of counterinsurgencies. While the common narrative for an effective counterinsurgency campaign focuses on the importance of information dominance, there has been little research into component factors that might either promote or inhibit the flow of information that is also critical in combating the American street-gang phenomenon. In reality, gangs exist because of an information advantage bestowed upon them by the population. Thus, we postulate that two factors, information volume and information processing, mutually contribute to information dominance with respect to a counter-gang strategy. Through comparative analysis, our research suggests that improving relationships between the population and the government encourages more communication about gang activities. Additionally, improving communication structures within the government enhances information processing. Combined, these two factors reduce the gang's information advantage.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/smalltowninsurge109455022
dc.format.extentxxii, 261 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCounterinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.lcshGangsen_US
dc.subject.lcshAsymmetric warfareen_US
dc.titleSmall town insurgency : the struggle for information dominance to reduce gang violenceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderLee, Doowan
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclc698377650
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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