Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorEsparza, Diego
dc.contributor.advisorBruneau, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Matthew K.
dc.dateSep-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-02T17:18:11Z
dc.date.available2016-11-02T17:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/50495
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractU.S. covert interventions in Iran (1953), Guatemala (1954), and Cuba (1961) represent one path dependent event sequence whereby institutions adopted pathological characteristics that carried the U.S. national security apparatus into the failed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs. Likewise, the U.S. overt intervention in Iraq (2003) represents a similar institutionally driven event sequence that carried the United States to war with Iraq under dubious justification. Through analyzing systemic factors that influenced policy formulation prior to and during the Eisenhower and Bush administrations, I argue that sufficient evidence exists to suggest that institutions developed based largely on ideologically driven threat perceptions of communism and terrorism negatively influenced policy formulation and contributed to undesirable outcomes in both event chains. Agency driven shifts in national security institutions to achieve ideologically based objectives during each administration drove U.S. foreign policy outside of previously institutionalized procedures by seizing upon opportunity structures created during periods of national fear stemming from salient political environments plagued with excessive communist and terrorist threat perceptions and rhetoric. Understanding how institutional path dependent factors converged in each of these cases may shed light on how to prevent such foreign policy missteps in the future.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/nationalsecurity1094550495
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleNational security and institutional pathologies: a path dependent analysis of U.S. interventions in Iran, Guatemala, Cuba, and Iraqen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorcommunismen_US
dc.subject.authorCuba 1961en_US
dc.subject.authorinstitutionsen_US
dc.subject.authorIran 1953en_US
dc.subject.authorIraq 2003en_US
dc.subject.authorGuatemala 1954en_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic nationalismen_US
dc.subject.authorLatin American studiesen_US
dc.subject.authornational security affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorpath dependenceen_US
dc.subject.authornational security strategyen_US
dc.subject.authorterrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorWestern Hemisphereen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record