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dc.contributor.advisorDahl, Erik J.
dc.contributor.authorBartholomeaux, Andrew T.
dc.dateSep-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-02T17:18:38Z
dc.date.available2016-11-02T17:18:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/50575
dc.description.abstractIn 2007, the United States and Mexico agreed to a bilateral anti-drug policy known as Mérida Initiative with the intent of disrupting organized crime and drug trafficking in Mexico. The initiative has persisted through multiple administrations on both sides of the border and received various scholarly criticisms for its oversimplification of the problem. Did funding and allocation of resources of the Mérida Initiative address the underlying issues that contributed to the drug trade in Mexico? Analyzing the historical foundations that supported the rise of organized crime in Mexico, combined with the factors that drive the drug trade, reveals an anti-drug policy focused on military operations and not on addressing the factors set forth in the initiative. This thesis exposes the underlying issues and analyzes allocation of resources to pinpoint where the focus is, and where it should be placed. This thesis concludes that allocation of resources are placed on security operations when they would be better suited on training the judicial branch in Mexico, improving the border, and improving the community to provide opportunities outside organized crime. Furthermore, that the United States has steps to take to fulfil its shared responsibility.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/meridinitiativei1094550575
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMerida Initiative: insight into U.S.-Mexico relationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderNieto-Gomez, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorMexicoen_US
dc.subject.authorMérida Initiativeen_US
dc.subject.authoranti-drug policyen_US
dc.subject.authororganized crimeen_US
dc.subject.authorborder securityen_US
dc.subject.authorarms traffickingen_US
dc.subject.authormoney launderingen_US
dc.subject.authorPlan Colombiaen_US
dc.subject.authorfailed stateen_US
dc.subject.authormilitarizationen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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