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dc.contributor.advisorYakimenko, Oleg A.
dc.contributor.authorO'Brian, Matthew D.
dc.dateSep-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-02T17:18:47Z
dc.date.available2016-11-02T17:18:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/50606
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractNumerous organizations within the Department of Defense have requested research and development efforts to create a lightweight Joint Precision Airdrop System (JPADS) capable of covertly distributing items to austere or contested locations. This mission has many critical challenges, with meteorological estimation near the top of the list due to a ram-air parachute's high susceptibility to environmental forces. Computer-based modeling of environmental conditions is extremely difficult due to the chaotic and often unpredictable interactions of environmental factors and the surrounding topography, so bench tests, flight tests, and the post-processing of the resultant test data were the research methods used in development of this thesis. Ultimately, this thesis presents two models for winds aloft prediction capable of presenting an increased fidelity solution. Both methods were field tested and could be used in JPADS guidance, navigation, and control algorithms.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWind assessment for aerial payload delivery systems using GPS and IMU sensorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderPapoulias, Fotis A.
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace
dc.subject.authorJPADSen_US
dc.subject.authoraerial deliveryen_US
dc.subject.authorcommercial off-the-shelfen_US
dc.subject.authorparachute controlen_US
dc.subject.authorwind estimationen_US
dc.subject.authorquaternionsen_US
dc.subject.authordynamic equationsen_US
dc.subject.authorkinematic equationsen_US
dc.subject.authorMATLABen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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