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dc.contributor.authorCenter on Contemporary Conflict
dc.contributor.authorChristopher, Grant
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-02T22:59:17Z
dc.date.available2016-11-02T22:59:17Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/50621
dc.descriptionPerformer: Kings College London Project Lead: Grant Christopher Project Cost: $104,486 FY16–17en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project will assess the likelihood of 3D printers being used to circumvent existing control regimes related to the nuclear fuel cycle. The project lead will investigate the impact of additive manufacturing on nuclear nonproliferation and the possibility of using off-the-shelf 3D printers to produce parts for centrifuges and other nuclear-fuel cycle relevant components. This research will provide important information for the global arms control community and academics concerned with nuclear proliferation pathways and will be valuable for academics and industry as they seek to understand the future uses for, and the potential need for restrictions on, 3D manufacturing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPASCCen_US
dc.format.extent1 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.titleUse of 3D Printing to Bypass Nuclear Export Controlsen_US
dc.typeReporten_US


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