Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBrophy, Chris
dc.contributor.authorJuillet, Daniel M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:44:03Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:44:03Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5064
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated multiple detonation diffraction events in order to better understand the limits and benefits of diffraction strategies with respect to pulse detonation engine design. Hydrogen/air detonations were generated using swept ramp obstacles in a 1.27 m long channel with a cross section of 25.4 mm by 88.9 mm and were diffracted into various multiple-stepped openings. This allowed the detonation wave diffraction transmission limits to be determined for hydrogen/air mixtures and to better understand reinitiating mechanisms throughout the diffraction process. Tests were conducted for area ratios ranging from 2.00-2.60 with varying equivalence ratios from 0.5-1.5. Computational methods were used to better understand the diffraction phenomenon using a series of sensitivity studies for different chemistry sets, computational cell size and equivalence ratio. Experimental tests used combined optical shadowgraph and particle image velocimetry imaging systems to provide shock wave detail and velocity information. The images were observed through a newly designed explosive proof optical section and split flow detonation channel. It was found that area ratios of 2.0 could survive single and double diffraction events over a range an equivalence ratio range of 0.8 to 1.14 Area ratios of 2.3 survived the primary diffraction event for equivalence ratios near stoichiometric for the given step length. Detonation diffraction for area ratios of 2.6 did not survive the primary diffraction event for any equivalence ratio and were unable to transmit to a larger combustor.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/detonationdiffra109455064
dc.format.extentxviii, 132 p. : ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEngineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshElectronicsen_US
dc.titleDetonation diffraction in a multi-step channelen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderSinibaldi, Jose
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.description.serviceCanadian Air Force authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclc698376221
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record