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dc.contributor.authorDahl, Erik J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-22T16:33:31Z
dc.date.available2016-12-22T16:33:31Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationErik J. Dahl (2013) Why Won't They Listen? Comparing Receptivity Toward Intelligence at Pearl Harbor and Midway, Intelligence and National Security, 28:1, 68-90, DOI: 10.1080/02684527.2012.749061en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/50941
dc.descriptionThe article of record may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02684527.2012.749061en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter surprise attacks and other intelligence failures, the complaint is often heard that if only decision-makers had listened more closely to the warnings they had received, disaster might have been avoided. But even though it is generally agreed that intelligence is of little use unless it is received and understood by policymakers, we actually know little about why some leaders are receptive toward intelligence, while others are not. This article argues that the willingness of decision- makers to listen to intelligence depends primarily on two factors: their belief in the seriousness of the issue or threat involved, and their trust in the utility of intelligence. It examines contrasting receptivity toward intelligence in the cases of Pearl Harbor and the Battle of Midway, and suggests that our current models of intelligence–policy relations need to be revised.en_US
dc.format.extent23 p.en_US
dc.publisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWhy Won’t They Listen? Comparing Receptivity Toward Intelligence at Pearl Harbor and Midwayen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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