456 hours to train the reserve component: analysis of the impact of increased annual training requirements on 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion

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Authors
Andrews, Kyle J.
Subjects
4th Assault Amphibian Battalion
Marine Corps Reserve
reserve component
training
general military training
annual training
Advisors
Brien, Spencer
Date of Issue
2016-12
Date
Dec-16
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The objective of this research is to analyze the impact of increased annual training requirements on the reserve component, specifically, the 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion. Time is a persistent constraint that the reserve force contends with to accomplish annual general military training requirements and mission essential tasks. Currently, there are 18 annual general military training requirements the reserve component must accomplish. Previous studies have attempted to reduce and combine annual training requirements to give time back to the commander. This research will not identify ways to reduce requirements; rather, it will identify ways that the reserve component can more efficiently and effectively accomplish annual training requirements based on feedback from Marines assigned to 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion. The study analyzes methods 4th Assault Amphibian Battalion uses to accomplish annual training requirements. Command chronology analysis and interviews provide exploratory insight to the unit's annual training model. Using command chronology data and interview transcripts, we develop a training model that can be used to improve training effectiveness and efficiency. We believe that adjusting how reserve units conduct 11 of the 18 annual general military training tasks will provide commanders additional time to focus on mission-essential task training.
Type
Thesis
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Department
Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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