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dc.contributor.authorMatsangas, Panagiotis
dc.contributor.authorShattuck, Nita Lewis
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T20:19:32Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T20:19:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.citationP. Matsangas, N.L. Shattuck, "discriminating between fatigue and sleepiness in the naval operational environment," Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 00 (2016), pp. 1-11.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/52492
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15402002.2016.122864en_US
dc.description.abstractTo assess the similarities and differences between reported levels of fatigue and sleepiness as a consequence of working at sea. Participants: 767 crewmembers of a U.S. Navy ship. Methods: Retrospective analysis of a survey to include questions about demographics, caffeine consumption, sleep adequacy, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Results: ESS scores (8.41 ± 4.66) indicated that 32% of the participants had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS score > 10), while approximately 7% had an ESS score of 16 or more. FSS scores (average FSS = 3.01 ± 1.37) indicated that 28% of the participants had elevated fatigue (FSS score ≥ 4). Even though ESS and FSS scores were correlated (r = 0.39), their association explained only 15% of the variability observed. In terms of behavioral and lifestyle patterns, crewmembers with elevated fatigue (FSS ≥ 4) reported getting less exercise than those reporting less fatigue. Individuals with excessive sleepiness (ESS > 10) reported higher caffeine consumption. Crewmembers with elevated fatigue and comorbid sleepiness (FSS ≥ 4 and ESS > 10) reported receiving less sleep than other crewmembers. Conclusions: These results suggest that subjective fatigue and subjective sleepiness, as measured by the FSS and ESS scales, are distinct constructs and both are consequences of working at sea. The scores on the two scales correlate differentially with behavioral and lifestyle patterns of the crewmembers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipChief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) N12en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Navy Advanced Medical Development Programen_US
dc.format.extent12 p.en_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDiscriminating between fatigue and sleepiness in the naval operational environmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Researchen_US


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