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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.advisorBellavita, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorLandry, Thomas Owen
dc.dateMar-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-10T16:31:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-10T16:31:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/53005
dc.description.abstractThe Department of Homeland Security (DHS) takes the lead or a significant supporting security role in many of the nation's most celebrated events across the country. Major events that receive the official designation of a national special security event and those rated Level 1 on the DHS special event rating scale share the same subcommittee planning structure. This thesis focuses on the potential vulnerabilities and gaps in the planning process due to groupthink and other organizational and individual decision-making pitfalls. This thesis then reviews what, if any, potential improvements can be made to the process with the formal adoption of a red team component. This thesis examines the potential benefits of incorporating red team techniques, such as simulation exercises, vulnerability probes, and analytical analysis into major-event security planning. Research indicates that their effectiveness varied on the organizational leadership, team composition, and independence afforded these teams in the performance of their assignment. The process of red teaming is vulnerable to being marginalized without proper organizational support. Armed with this knowledge, this thesis proposes two recommendations for the formal adoption of red team techniques into the subcommittee process of major-event security planning.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/embracingdevilnn1094553005
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEmbracing the devil: an analysis of the formal adoption of red teaming in the security planning for major eventsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorDepartment of Homeland Securityen_US
dc.subject.authorred teamen_US
dc.subject.authorgroupthinken_US
dc.subject.authormajor event securityen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited States Secret Serviceen_US
dc.description.serviceDeputy Special Agent in Charge, United States Secret Serviceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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