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dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorLombardo, Steven M.
dc.dateMar-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-10T16:31:51Z
dc.date.available2017-05-10T16:31:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/53012
dc.description.abstractThis research was designed to characterize the frequency response of Novel Paradigm (NP) Supercapacitors employing Nanotube Super Dielectric Materials as dielectrics. The result of tests with nine capacitors, each with a unique aqueous salt solution, provided detailed information required to design short pulse systems. This detailed information is required for engineering analysis of NP Supercapacitors in systems of interest to the U.S. Navy (USN) such as the railgun, electromagnetic aircraft launch system, and free electron laser. Key findings show salt identity and concentration impact performance, very high energy densities (>150 J/cm3) are found for slow discharges (~100 s), and power density increases as discharge rate increases. Finally, the best power density measured at a discharge rate relevant to USN application (~0.01 s) was 90 W/cm3 using an aqueous salt identity of 30 wt% Ammonium Chloride. This is a significant improvement (>3x) relative to available commercial supercapacitors.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/characterization1094553012
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCharacterization of anodized titanium-based novel paradigm supercapacitors: impact of salt identity and frequency on dielectric values, power, and energy densitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderLuhrs, Claudia
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)
dc.subject.authorcapacitoren_US
dc.subject.authorsuper dielectric materialen_US
dc.subject.authortitanium dioxideen_US
dc.subject.authornanotubesen_US
dc.subject.authorammonium chlorideen_US
dc.subject.authorsodium nitrateen_US
dc.subject.authorpotassium hydroxideen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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