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dc.contributor.authorCoursey, Todd
dc.dateTuesday, 11 April 2017
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T00:15:15Z
dc.date.available2017-05-18T00:15:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/53349
dc.descriptionTechCon2017 (CRUSER)en_US
dc.descriptionPresented by LT Todd Coursey, USN: NPS Physicsen_US
dc.descriptionIncludes slidesen_US
dc.description.abstractLow-cost unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are equipped with a variety of passive and active sensors and increasingly sophisticated technological capabilities; everything from cameras and radio frequency collection devices to commercially available materials that culminate in deployment of weapons. It is widely assumed that targets of vital interest are being watched and targeted. Bottom line, UAV operations are not limited to overseas battlefields; they have already been used to disrupt our daily routines within the continental United States and WILL exploit and violate traditional security measures surrounding our borders, DoD facilities, nuclear facilities and public venues. Because UAV emerging technologies are driven by commercial applications, and most components are available in off-the-shelf applications, it is likely that near future UAVs will be as capable as the best of our small systems in operation today. Technologies used to counter UAV threats on the battlefield are not effective within our own borders. Planners cannot assume they are exempt from fines or prosecution for violating civil airspace or spectrum management policies in the interest of thwarting a potential hazard, counter UAV operations in most cases must be in compliance with Federal Laws. Numerous commercial and Federal organizations are exploring products that will disrupt and destroy Low Slow UAVs. Engagement methods range from simple and low tech such as air blasts, and small munitions –to- more sophisticated and costly outcomes such as Peregrine or counter attack UAVs. By deploying and repurposing technologies such as MEMS, low-end microphones (such as those found on all smartphones); our acoustic system could provide UAV triangulation and early warning on simple technology with a transmittable beacon for the identification and subsequent engagement. Apps can be created (from the acoustic signature) that can display information about the type of UAV detected, which will then determine appropriate engagement methods. By seeking out and establishing cooperative partnerships, we will then be able to resource and collaborate with other Federal agencies to integrate our current acoustic research with other programs and present best options for an integrated total system that will address the follow on concerns from identification to engagement of low slow UAVs.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNPS CRUSERen_US
dc.publisherNaval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Californiaen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMEMS Acoustic Sensor for Drone Detection [video]en_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics


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