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dc.contributor.authorOtani, Thomas W.
dc.contributor.authorDrusinsky, Doron
dc.contributor.authorMichael, James Bret
dc.contributor.authorShing, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:00:37Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2008-08-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/537
dc.description.abstractThis is our third report on real-time Java. Our previous work to develop and evaluate the Shadow Design Pattern was couched in the context of real-time garbage collection with assignable priorities as implemented for example in the Sun Java Real-Time System. In this report, we present our investigation of the pattern from the perspective of non-assignable priorities. Our experiment consisted of running the real-time application we used in our previous study on IBM WebSphere Real Time. IBM WebSphere Real Time automatically sets Metronome, its incremental real-time garbage collector, to a priority higher than the highest priority of the real-time threads that use the heap. The results from the experiment show that the modified code for the Shadow Design Pattern runs well under Metronome.en_US
dc.format.extent19 p.: ill.;28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.titleA comparison of priority-based and incremental real-time garbage collectors in the implementation of the shadow design patternen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.corporateUnited States.Missile Defense Agency.
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Science
dc.subject.authorRefuse collection.en_US
dc.subject.authorSystems engineering.en_US
dc.subject.authorComputer programming.en_US
dc.description.funderFunding number: MD7080101P0630.en_US
dc.identifier.oclcocn247490921
dc.identifier.npsreportNPS-CS-08-011


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