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dc.contributor.authorDiRenzo, Marco
dc.contributor.authorAten, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorRosikiewicz, Blythe
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Jason
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Adam
dc.contributor.authorVolkmann, Benny
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-05T18:03:35Z
dc.date.available2017-07-05T18:03:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationM. DiRenzo, K. Aten, B. Rosikiewicz, J. Barnes, C. Brown, A. Shapiro, B. Volkmann, "Career Development International, v.22, no.3 (2017), pp. 260-279.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/55175
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/CDI-09-2016-0152en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of turnover intention in extra roles. Design/methodology/approach – This mixed-methods study began with a qualitative analysis of interviews of US Marine Corps reservists, which identified drivers of turnover and suggested a predictive model and hypotheses, tested with a subsequent quantitative analysis. Findings – The results show that relations, meaning, and role conflict predict embeddedness in the US Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR), which is negatively related to turnover intentions. The sub-dimensions of the three drivers are clarified. Research limitations/implications – The research contributes to understanding the antecedents of embeddedness and turnover in extra roles. It also highlights extra roles as a source of role conflict. This study was limited to the USMCR, one extra role. All participants in the qualitative phase of the study were male officers. Although the quantitative study included enlisted and officers, men were still more strongly represented. The results should be replicated across different types of extra roles and should include different job types and personal characteristics. Originality/value – This study develops and tests a predictive model of embeddedness and turnover in the understudied context of salient extra roles. It clarifies antecedents of embeddedness in an extra role context and indicates that salient extra roles may be an additional source of role conflict in people’s lives.en_US
dc.format.extent20 p.en_US
dc.publisherEmerald Publishing Limiteden_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEmbeddedness and turnover intentions in extra roles: a mixed-methods analysis of the United States Marine Corp Reserveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorEmbeddednessen_US
dc.subject.authorTurnoveren_US
dc.subject.authorExtra rolesen_US
dc.subject.authorRole conflicten_US


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