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dc.contributor.authorHafez, Mohammed M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T17:41:05Z
dc.date.available2017-07-12T17:41:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-02
dc.identifier.citationM.M. Hafez, "The tie that binds: how terrorists exploit family bonds," CTC Sentinel, (February 2016), pp. 15-17.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/55212
dc.description.abstractTightening security environments are encouraging jihadis to turn increasingly to the family unit for recruits. This phenomenon complicates efforts to detect, monitor, and prevent violent radicalization. Kinship recruitment, which is difficult for security agencies to observe, is facilitated by several psychological mechanisms that bind individuals together on the path to extremism. Importantly, it deters ambivalent recruits from defecting to the authorities for fear of damaging their own valued relationships. The reliance on kinship recruitment is supplemented by greater use of social media and an emphasis on recruiting Islamic converts and women, which suggests that jihadis are adjusting their mobilization patterns to avoid detection based on previous, well-known strategies for radicalization.en_US
dc.format.extent3 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe ties that bind: how terrorists exploit family bondsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US


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