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dc.contributor.advisorAugier, Mie-Sophia
dc.contributor.advisorDillard, John T.
dc.contributor.authorSantiago, Juan R. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorCusack, Steven R.
dc.dateJun-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T16:46:34Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T16:46:34Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/55529
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2005, the U.S. military found itself inadequately prepared with doctrine and materiel to wage counterinsurgency operations in Iraq. As the insurgency adapted to American tactics, the high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) became a target of the insurgency because of its lack of armor, which led to significant casualties caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs). The U.S. response to the IED threat to HMMWVs was to procure the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle, a costly endeavor. The MRAP increased Soldier and Marine survival rates during IED attacks, but other aspects of the vehicle contradicted counterinsurgency strategy. Because of its survivability, leaders expected tactical commanders to use the MRAP, which reduced tactical commanders' variety of options to engage the enemy. This research explores the value of variety in major military systems by applying concepts from the Law of Requisite Variety and uses the MRAP as an example of a materiel solution throughout. Increasing system variety conflicts with current acquisition practices, which prefer commonality. This research finds that warfighter capabilities increase with variety, but variety is contra to achieving commonality and cost savings. To achieve a balance between commonality and variety, the authors suggest organizational and system hardware alternatives.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/applicabilityofl1094555529
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleApplicability of the Law of Requisite Variety in major military system acquisitionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorLaw of Requisite Varietyen_US
dc.subject.authorinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorcounterinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorvarietyen_US
dc.subject.authorcomplex systemsen_US
dc.subject.authorAshbyen_US
dc.subject.authorIraqen_US
dc.subject.authorOperation Iraqi Freedomen_US
dc.subject.authorsurgeen_US
dc.subject.authorMine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicleen_US
dc.subject.authorMRAPen_US
dc.subject.authorwheeled vehicle strategyen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary acquisitionen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Colonel, United States Armyen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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