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dc.contributor.advisorEsparza, Diego
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Brian S.
dc.dateJun-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T16:47:41Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T16:47:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/55588
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe U.S. military cooperates more with the Colombian military than the Mexican military in combating drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. This thesis analyzes the international relations theories of liberalism, realism, and constructivism to help explain why. Historical relationships matter in cooperation. Mexican and U.S. military units waged war to defend and take territory from one another. Mexico passed a constitution banning a garrison of foreign military units within Mexico, leading to low cooperation. The Colombian and U.S. militaries defended the Panama Canal during World War II to keep the shipping lanes open, and Colombia allows a garrison of U.S. military personnel in Colombia, leading to greater cooperation. Realism best explains reasons for when and why these two countries cooperate with the United States. Cooperation exists when there are shared external security concerns by the two countries. Cooperation exists when the internal instability of one country creates a reliance on another country. Cooperation remains low when there is no common external security threat, when one state perceives the other as a threat, or when a country can control internal stability on its own. Further cooperation with Mexico will depend on U.S. military leaders' willingness to empathize with Mexicans about past U.S. military interventions. Further cooperation with Colombia will require continued military-to- military relationships to form, followed by agreements to solidify those relationships.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCombating drug trafficking: Variation in the United States' military cooperation with Colombia and Mexicoen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorColombiaen_US
dc.subject.authorMexicoen_US
dc.subject.authorWestern Hemisphereen_US
dc.subject.authordrug traffickingen_US
dc.subject.authorTOCen_US
dc.subject.authormilitaryen_US
dc.subject.authorsecurityen_US
dc.subject.authorrealismen_US
dc.subject.authorliberalismen_US
dc.subject.authorconstructivismen_US
dc.subject.authorinternational relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorborderen_US
dc.subject.authorsovereigntyen_US
dc.subject.authordefenseen_US
dc.subject.authorFARCen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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