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dc.contributor.advisorPace, Phillip E.
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Terry E.
dc.contributor.authorMagalhães, Marcelo Vellozo
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:45:48Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:45:48Z
dc.date.issued2011-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5558
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn order to quantify any node's capacity to support optimal information flow within a distributed command and control network, a novel node capability value calculation is developed from first principles. The expression for the node capability value is developed using three fundamental building blocks: data throughput, bandwidth efficiency, and the link margin. The data throughput depends on the average packet arrival rate, the probability of not dropping a packet and the probability of correct receiving a packet at the queue. The bandwidth efficiency depends on the node data rate and the transmission bandwidth, while the link margin is a function of the received and required energy per bit to noise power density. The generalized connectivity integrates the computed node capability value by considering all the distributed network connections scaled by their route length and estimating the characteristic tempo, which is the maximum information exchange rate. The generalized connectivity results reflect the amount and quality of detectable information that the nodes can process and transmit about the network. The results also show how the power and bandwidth efficiency of any specific node compares the power and bandwidth efficiency of all the other nodes. A four-node dynamic scenario is simulated and used to numerically evaluate the expression for the node capability value. Command and control tradeoff issues facing battlespace managers and decision makers are examined by including the networks characteristic tempo into a single observe, orient, decide and act (OODA loop). Also, included in the OODA loop, are action tempos and the command and control speed. Consideration of the influence of three classic Sheridan levels of automation on decision making are used to model the operational impacts via three action tempo tiers: high, medium, and low-action. Input command and control information rates produced the strongest observed influences on aggregate network simulation outputs.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/adaptivenodecapa109455558
dc.format.extentxvi, 95 p. : col. ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshElectronics in military engineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshSystems engineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshTopologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshCommunicationsen_US
dc.subject.lcshNetwork-centric operations (Military science)en_US
dc.titleAdaptive node capability metric to assess the value of networking in a general command and control wireless communication topologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences (IS)
dc.identifier.oclc760080021
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineElectronic Warfare Systems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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