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dc.contributor.advisorSadagic, Amela
dc.contributor.authorMcDevitt, Deanna M.
dc.dateSep-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-07T23:40:07Z
dc.date.available2017-11-07T23:40:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56157
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSince 9/11, the fire service has experienced a shift and an expansion in the nature of threats and hazards that it faces. Despite advances in the field, firefighters are still losing their lives inside of burning buildings, and they must find new ways of identifying training gaps and improving current training practices. This thesis explores whether emergency incidents connected to low frequency and high risk events contain sufficient warning signs or indicators of imminent catastrophic events, if firefighters could identify them, and if there was a potential of changing decision making and averting a tragedy. In order to create a firm basis for this discovery, this research effort included a detailed analysis of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s line of duty death reports from the years 2013–2015. The work provided an opportunity to learn from past events and practices and identify successes and failures in the firefighting domain without the bias of being closely involved with the cases or having a specific agenda. Quantitative analysis performed on this data set and the knowledge gleaned from looking at the events after the fact provide a foundation for advising novel training approaches and scenarios that can be used to train both individuals and teams of fire fighters.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/searchingforeffe1094556157
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titleSearching for effective training solutions for firefighting: the analysis of emergency responses and line of duty death reports for low frequency, high risk eventsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWoodbury, Glen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorfirefightingen_US
dc.subject.authorfirefighter line of duty deathsen_US
dc.subject.authorvirtual realityen_US
dc.subject.authoraugmented realityen_US
dc.subject.authorsimulationen_US
dc.subject.authordecision-makingen_US
dc.subject.authorlow frequency and high risk eventsen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, Boston Fire Departmenten_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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