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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorQuirk, Patti
dc.dateSep-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-07T23:40:30Z
dc.date.available2017-11-07T23:40:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56169
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractArchitecture communicates a message about the purpose of a space, the prestige of those who use or own the space, and the values associated with both users and owners. The aesthetics of this architecture elicit specific emotions, communicate histories, and inform worldviews. In the United States, homeland security architecture is largely a physical representation of a perceived threat of a terrorist attack in public spaces. Architecture has sociological, psychological, and cultural effects, as well as security impacts, but there is little research or discourse on the physical manifestation of homeland security in the United States. What are the consequences--intended and unintended--of homeland security architecture? How does a democratic government protect itself and design buildings and public spaces that are open, attractive, and promote both physical and psychological security? This thesis is a starting point for broader awareness and discussion within the emerging discipline of security design about the importance of aesthetics in homeland security.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/fortressamericae1094556169
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titleFortress America: the aesthetics of homeland security in the public realmen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authoraestheticsen_US
dc.subject.authorhomeland securityen_US
dc.subject.authorarchitectureen_US
dc.subject.authorpublic realmen_US
dc.subject.authorhostile vehicle mitigationen_US
dc.subject.authorurban designen_US
dc.description.servicePublic Space Management/Emergency Management, Seattle Department of Transportationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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