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dc.contributor.advisorLooney, Robert
dc.contributor.authorSpitler, Russell H.
dc.dateSep-17
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-07T23:40:54Z
dc.date.available2017-11-07T23:40:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56180
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.descriptionReissued 27 Sep 2018 to reflect updated abstract on pages i and v.
dc.description.abstractIn April 2016, the Saudi Arabian government announced Vision 2030, a highly ambitious reform program designed to move the country away from its reliance on oil revenues and to liberalize its conservative social dynamics. Despite the monarchy’s autocratic power, the kingdom has largely failed to employ citizens in the private sector, diversify its industries beyond hydrocarbon-related activity, and privatize the key drivers of its economy since adopting these goals in 1970. The majority of the population is under the age of 30, unemployment is high, and international energy markets are changing, so the country’s leadership needs to make changes that provide opportunity for the people and make the economy more sustainable. This thesis examines why the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) struggles to implement economic and social reform. Analyzing interconnected political, economic, and social causes that manifest in the structure of the state and society, the resource curse, and market inefficiencies, the ultimate barrier to reform is the kingdom’s political dynamics. Without improvements to governance and modifications to the country’s patronage policies, economic change will be limited at best. Elites’ preferences for blocking political reform has hampered achievement of economic goals and will continue to prove problematic if not rescinded.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/blurryvisioninst1094556180
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, it may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleBlurry vision: institutional impediments to reform in Saudi Arabiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBarma, Naazneen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorSaudi Arabiaen_US
dc.subject.authorVision 2030en_US
dc.subject.authorNTPen_US
dc.subject.authorFBPen_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic reformen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial reformen_US
dc.subject.authorpolitical reformen_US
dc.subject.authorpolitical economyen_US
dc.subject.authorinstitutionsen_US
dc.subject.authorresource curseen_US
dc.subject.authorrent seekingen_US
dc.subject.authorcorruptionen_US
dc.subject.authoroilen_US
dc.subject.authoroil curseen_US
dc.subject.authorrentier stateen_US
dc.subject.authorpatronageen_US
dc.subject.authorsubsidiesen_US
dc.subject.authorvolatilityen_US
dc.subject.authorSaudizationen_US
dc.subject.authorprivatizationen_US
dc.subject.authordiversificationen_US
dc.subject.authormonarchyen_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic growthen_US
dc.subject.authordevelopmenten_US
dc.subject.authorunemploymenten_US
dc.subject.authorhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.authoryouth bulgeen_US
dc.subject.authorWahhabien_US
dc.subject.authoreducationen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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