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dc.contributor.authorBacolod, Marigee
dc.contributor.authorRangel, Marcos A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-22T16:13:56Z
dc.date.available2017-11-22T16:13:56Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationM. Bacolod, M.A. Rangel, "Economic assimilation and skill acquisition: Evidence from the occupational sorting of childhood immigrants," Demography, v.54 (2017), pp. 571-602.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56248
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-017-05588-2en_US
dc.description.abstractWe study the economic assimilation of childhood immigrants to the United States. The linguistic distance between English and the predominant language in one’s country of birth interacted with age at arrival is shown to be closely connected to occupational sorting in adulthood. By applying big-data techniques to occupations’ detailed skill requirements, we provide evidence that childhood immigrants from English-distant countries who arrived after the primary school years reveal comparative advantages in tasks distinct from those for which (close to) Anglophone immigrants are better suited. Meanwhile, those who arrive at younger ages specialize in a bundle of skills very similar to that supplied by observationally equivalent workers. These patterns emerge even after we net out the effects of formal education. Such findings are compatible with the existence of different degrees of complementarity between relative English-learning potential at arrival and the acquisition of multiple capabilities demanded in the U.S. labor market (math/logic, socioemotional, physical, and communication skills). Consistent with the investment-complementarity argument, we show that linguistic distance and age at arrival also play a significant role on the choice of college major within this population.en_US
dc.format.extent33 p.en_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEconomic assimilation and skill acquisition: evidence from the occupational sorting of childhood imiigrantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorImmigrationen_US
dc.subject.authorAssimilationen_US
dc.subject.authorSkillsen_US
dc.subject.authorEnglishen_US
dc.subject.authorSpecializationen_US


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