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dc.contributor.authorGingeras, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T23:06:44Z
dc.date.available2017-12-12T23:06:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56439
dc.description.abstractFor much of the postwar era, heroin trafficking into Western Europe and North America was an industry dominated by French and Italian trafficking networks. The most powerful of these networks, famously labeled the “French Connection,” held sway over the transatlantic trade from their base of operations in Marseilles for over a quarter of a century. Since the collapse of the French Connection in 1973, a variety of groups have seized control over the transshipment of heroin into Western Europe and North America. Among the most recent and noted actors to play a role in the contemporary narcotics trade are Albanians from the former Yugoslavia. Despite the growing prominence of Albanian organized crime groups, there is a great deal about this element of the Eastern European underworld that remains unknown. Very little empirical research has been conducted into the early origins of the various Albanian organized crime factions.en_US
dc.format.extent6 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBrothers and clients: heroin, Turkey, and the making of the Albanian "Mafia"en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US


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