Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBarma, Naazneen
dc.contributor.authorRatner, Ely
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-10T16:47:18Z
dc.date.available2018-01-10T16:47:18Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationN. Barma, E. Ratner, S. Weber, "The mythical liberal order," the National Interest, (March/April 2013), pp. 56-67.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56632
dc.description.abstractAfter a year and a half of violence and tens of thousands of deaths in Syria, the UN Security Council convened in July 2012 to consider exerting additional international pressure on President Bashar al-Assad. And for the third time in nine months, Russia and China vetoed any moves toward multilateral intervention. Less than two weeks later, Kofi Annan resigned as the joint UN-Arab League special envoy for Syria, lamenting, “I can’t want peace more than the protagonists, more than the Security Council or the international community for that matter.”en_US
dc.format.extent12 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe mythical liberal orderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record