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dc.contributor.authorBarma, Naazneen H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-10T17:04:22Z
dc.date.available2018-01-10T17:04:22Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationN.H. Barma, "Peace-building and the predatory political economy of insecurity: evidence from Cambodia, East Timor and Afghanistan," Conflict, Security & Development, v.12, no.3, (2012), pp.273-298.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56633
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14678802.2012.703535
dc.description.abstractInternational peace-building interventions in post-conflict countries are intended to transform the socio-political context that led to violence and thereby build a stable and lasting peace. Yet the UN’s transitional governance approach to peace-building is ill-suited to the challenge of dealing with the predatory political economy of insecurity that often emerges in post- conflict societies. Evidence from peace-building attempts in Cambodia, East Timor and Afghanistan illustrates that the political economy incentives facing domestic elites in an environment of low credibility and weak institutionalization lead to a cycle of patronage generation and distribution that undermine legitimate and effective governance. As a result, postconflict countries are left vulnerable to renewed conflict and persistent insecurity. International interventions can only craft lasting peace by understanding the political economy of conflict persistence and the potential policy levers for altering, rather than perpetuating, those dynamics.en_US
dc.format.extent26 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titlePeace-building and the predatory political economy of insecurity: evidence from Cambodia, East Timor and Afghanistanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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