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dc.contributor.advisorStrawser, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorKingsley, Jonathan D.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:33:39Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:33:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56744
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent management theory finds that deeply held values provide a significant explanation for the behavior of professionals. Accordingly, this thesis illuminates the positive impact that the 1st Special Forces Regiment's ethical structure--the SF Ethic--has on the organization's effectiveness. The study describes the SF Ethic through the lens of the two major (opposing) normative ethical theories: consequentialism and non-consequentialism. It determines that the SF Ethic is a combination of both theories along with Virtue Theory. The latter contains the notion of prudence, which offers a balanced and deliberative middle path, a means by which to navigate a tension that exists between the former two theories. The SF Ethic--Effectiveness pathway depicts the process by which an SF soldier operating under the SF Ethic might contribute to effectiveness. Values shape principles that define one's duties. Then professional and prudential judgment--influenced by organizational and operational factors--informs decisions. Essential contextual factors include the environment (often complex and unstable), organizational structure (a professional-adhocracy within a machine bureaucracy), and culture. Organizational theory concepts--commitment, trust, and professionalism--empirically evince the SF Ethic--SF Effectiveness correlation. Likewise, Army and SF publications offer trust-based explanations-- related to legitimacy and influence--for the SF Ethic--SF Effectiveness link. Recommendations include organizing the various conceptions of values and attributes to provide a sense of hierarchy, priority, and common definitions across sources; developing a semi-algorithmic process guide to help operators systematically think through moral dilemmas; and adding an ethics training block to the SF Qualification Course to professionalize the force and contribute to organizational effectiveness.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/specialforcesval1094556744
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleSpecial forces values: how the regiment's ethical framework influences its organizational effectivenessen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderJansen, Erik
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorSpecial Forcesen_US
dc.subject.authorethicsen_US
dc.subject.authornormative theoryen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational theoryen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational designen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational cultureen_US
dc.subject.authorinstitutional theoryen_US
dc.subject.authormanagement theoryen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational behavioren_US
dc.subject.authorincentivesen_US
dc.subject.authormotivation theoryen_US
dc.subject.authoreffectivenessen_US
dc.subject.authorhuman resourcesen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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