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dc.contributor.advisorRothstein, Hy S.
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Matthew G.
dc.contributor.authorBusbey, Noah E. B.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:34:29Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:34:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56787
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe types of attribution for influence activities span a spectrum that includes true attribution, non-attribution, concurring partner attribution, and false attribution. The U.S. Department of Defense sits in a unique position among U.S. agencies, as it must remain capable of conducting influence activities across that spectrum. This includes activities such as public affairs, military information support operations, and military deception. While U.S. military doctrine clearly defines and delineates the various types of attribution for influence activities and messages, notably absent is when and how attribution should be used. There is also little scholarly literature that specifically explores the issue of attribution. Despite this dearth of information, an analysis of historical cases can help identify the conditions best suited for the various types of attribution. This thesis explores those cases and identifies relative power as a potential variable to determine attribution. It tests the hypothesis that false and non-attribution methods are most effective when in a relatively weak position, and as operational success and relative power are achieved, influence activities with true attribution become more effective.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/attributionininf1094556787
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAttribution in influence: relative power and the use of attributionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderHammond, Jesse R.
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorattributionen_US
dc.subject.authorinfluenceen_US
dc.subject.authorpsychological operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorPSYOPen_US
dc.subject.authorpsychological warfareen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary information support operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorMISOen_US
dc.subject.authorinformation operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorIOen_US
dc.subject.authorWorld War IIen_US
dc.subject.authorVietnamen_US
dc.subject.authorCrimeaen_US
dc.subject.authorspecial operationsen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Information Strategy and Political Warfareen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Strategy and Political Warfareen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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