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dc.contributor.advisorDahl, Erick
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Paul
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Craig M.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:35:02Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:35:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56816
dc.description.abstractDespite a continued threat of violent extremism, current efforts to develop and implement nationally led programming to counter violent extremism in the United States are ineffective. America's current countering violent extremism (CVE) strategy suffers from a lack of scale and foundational scientific support, and contains no system of metrics to evaluate its success. This thesis conducts a comparative policy analysis between the United States' and the United Kingdom's CVE strategies to identify their respective strengths and, in doing so, to determine which UK policies may be leveraged to improve the American CVE strategy. In furthering the discussion surrounding American CVE efforts, this thesis surveys several models from social science to demonstrate the value of incorporating scientifically supported research into future CVE policy discussions. Concluding the comparative analysis and discussion of scientific theory, the thesis closes with a series of policy recommendations and implementation plans for consideration. Based on the research presented, it is recommended that the United States adopt nationally led, locally implemented CVE policies like those found in the United Kingdom's Prevent strategy, and that improved strategies are grounded in social science research.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/counteringviolen1094556816
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titleCountering violent extremism policy in the United States: are CVE programs in America effectively mitigating the threat of homegrown violent extremism?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorCVEen_US
dc.subject.authorcountering violent extremismen_US
dc.subject.authorCVE and social scienceen_US
dc.subject.authorCVE in the United Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorcomparison of CVE in U.S. and UKen_US
dc.subject.authorCVE recommendations for the United Statesen_US
dc.description.serviceMaster Detective, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Departmenten_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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