Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCunha, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorTrainor, Braden T.
dc.contributor.authorKim, David S.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:35:12Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:35:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56825
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractWe examined relevant literature on military compensation, recruitment, and retention to explore how best the Department of Defense (DOD) could improve its talent management. How can we provide qualified personnel for the world's leading military when we are faced with the need for a U.S. military force capable of meeting the complex assignments and challenges of the future? Findings include that (1) the DOD needs proactive conversations regarding compensation that feature military members, (2) the DOD may consider including pay incentives and compensation as a force-shaping tool to recruit more experienced enlistees and those with specialized training, as well as successfully competing with the private sector, and (3) overall, the DOD could rethink its definition of the ideal soldier to meet tomorrow's potential military needs. The literature, including articles based on personnel economics, also revealed the need to craft more long-term military leaders and highlighted nine main areas in which to potentially do so. Theses main areas are: using compensation as a tool to retain the best qualified personnel, adjusting the pyramid structure to include more long-term leaders, increasing attention and resources toward retention, considering the X-factor, paying careful attention to military families, avoiding service member over-generalization, compensating job design, implementing qualitative measures of effectiveness, and training leaders toward diplomatic aplomb.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/contemporaryissu1094556825
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleContemporary issues in compensation with respect to recruiting and retention: questions and opportunities for the U.S. militaryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderCandreva, Philip
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorcompensationen_US
dc.subject.authormilitaryen_US
dc.subject.authortalent managementen_US
dc.subject.authorpersonnel economicsen_US
dc.subject.authorrecruitmenten_US
dc.subject.authorretentionen_US
dc.subject.authorpay incentivesen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record