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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Doowan
dc.contributor.advisorEverton, Sean
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Matthew S.
dc.contributor.authorMaggard, Andrew J.
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robert L.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:35:57Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:35:57Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56860
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout the early 2000s, multiple countries across Latin America elected populist, leftist governments in a sociopolitical movement known as the Pink Tide. Eight Latin American countries currently encompass this regional bloc, aiming to limit U.S. regional influence. Many of the countries have turned to foreign state actors like Iran to support anti-U.S. economic and security initiatives. While many of the populist, leftist governments are transitioning to more conservative political leadership and away from vehemently anti-U.S. rhetoric characterized by the Pink Tide movement, this research demonstrates the enduring strategic importance of the complex network connecting various key individuals, corporations, quasi-governmental organizations, and Transnational, Transregional Threat networks (T3N) supported by the government of Iran. This research illuminates and maps the social, economic, and political components of the Pink Tide network that serves as the connective tissue among the leftist countries of Latin America and demonstrates how Iran has leveraged the movement for its own geostrategic ends. By utilizing social network analysis and open-source materials, our research identifies observable political, ideological, physical, and virtual networks in Latin America that the United States must engage to maintain or increase its strategic influence in the region.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/convergenceinlat1094556860
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleConvergence in Latin America: illuminating the Pink Tide and Iranian nexus through social network analysisen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorPink Tideen_US
dc.subject.authorALBAen_US
dc.subject.authorTransnational and Transregional Threat Networksen_US
dc.subject.authorT3Nen_US
dc.subject.authorIranian Threat Networken_US
dc.subject.authorITNen_US
dc.subject.authorGovernment of Venezuelaen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial Network Analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorSNAen_US
dc.subject.authorRabbani networken_US
dc.subject.authorEl Aissami networken_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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