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dc.contributor.advisorDillard, John
dc.contributor.advisorMortlock, Robert
dc.contributor.authorEhn, Eric J.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:37:00Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:37:00Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56910
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of artificial intelligence systems is ready to transition from basic science research and a blooming commercial industry to strategic implementation in the Defense Acquisition system. The purpose of this research is to determine the problems awaiting artificial intelligence (AI) systems inherent to defense acquisition. AI is a field of scientific study focused on the construction of systems that can act rationally, behave humanly, and adapt. To achieve AI behavior takes AI essentials, which consider mobility, system perspective, and algorithms. Unfortunately, AI essentials are under addressed in the concept of operations that fuels the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System. Influences to the concept of operations analyzed in this research include strategic documentation, joint technology demonstrations, and exercises that aim to capture technology-based lessons learned. Failure to address AI essentials causes problems in defense acquisition: system requirements are impossible to define; transition of AI technology fails; testing cannot be evaluated with confidence; and life cycle planning is at best a guess. To address these issues, the Department of Defense needs improved planning, acquisition personnel training, and AI-supported acquisition processes to achieve cost, schedule, and performance goals.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/artificialintell1094556910
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleArtificial intelligence: the bumpy path through defense acquisitionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorartificial intelligenceen_US
dc.subject.authorAIen_US
dc.subject.authorautonomousen_US
dc.subject.authorautonomicen_US
dc.subject.authoracquisitionen_US
dc.subject.authorvalidated requirementsen_US
dc.subject.authortechnology demonstrationen_US
dc.subject.authortechnology transitionen_US
dc.subject.authorrequirements analysisen_US
dc.subject.authortest and evaluationen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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