Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLee, Doowan
dc.contributor.advisorWarren, Camber
dc.contributor.authorHamlin, Anders C.
dc.dateDec-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T20:37:34Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T20:37:34Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/56934
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.descriptionIncludes supplementary material
dc.description.abstractSpecial warfare operations often require cooperation and partnership with different types of indigenous affiliated armed groups. These groups may be rebels fighting against a government or militias collaborating with a government. In many cases, the armed groups will go on to form the nucleus of a new regime. As sponsor-affiliate relationships progress over time, objectives and ideology can diverge, leading to problems with, or even termination of, the relationship. This study examines the sponsor-affiliate relationship from the sponsor's perspective, focusing on how successful external sponsors use effective client management to build and maintain influence over extended periods of time. To identify the critical factors of effective client management--those that enable durable, long-running relationships with high degrees of compatibility--this thesis uses quantitative analysis of the Sponsorship of Rebels (SOR), and other data sets, as well as qualitative analysis of Iran's sponsorship of the Iraqi Badr Organization and its offshoots, and of Cuba's sponsorship of the MPLA in Angola. The research supports the delineation of five critical factors of effective client management: sponsor competition, client competition, sponsor oversight, client organizational enforcement, and client dependence. Additionally, the case studies provide historical examples of successful effective client management.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/effectiveclientm1094556934
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEffective client management: maximizing the influence of external sponsors over affiliated armed groupsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorunconventional warfareen_US
dc.subject.authorsupport to rebelsen_US
dc.subject.authorclient managementen_US
dc.subject.authorproxy warfareen_US
dc.subject.authoraffiliateen_US
dc.subject.authorproxyen_US
dc.subject.authorsurrogateen_US
dc.subject.authorsponsor competitionen_US
dc.subject.authorclient competitionen_US
dc.subject.authorsponsor oversighten_US
dc.subject.authorclient organizational enforcementen_US
dc.subject.authorclient dependenceen_US
dc.subject.authorprincipal-agent theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorBadr Corpsen_US
dc.subject.authorIranen_US
dc.subject.authorMPLAen_US
dc.subject.authorCubaen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record