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dc.contributor.authorYost, David
dc.dateMay 2015
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-02T19:08:51Z
dc.date.available2018-03-02T19:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.citation"The Budapest memorandum and Russia's Itervention in Ukraine," International Affairs, vol. 91, no. 3 (May 2015), pp. 505-538en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/57105
dc.description.abstractThe Budapest Memorandum won attention in 2014 as an early casualty of the Ukraine crisis. The memorandum concerning Ukraine was one of three almost identically worded statements issued in December 1994, alongside similar documents for Belarus and Kazakhstan. Meeting in the margins of the Budapest summit of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE),1 Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States extended security assurances to Belarus, Kazakhstan and Ukraine in return for their acceding to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) as non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS) and transferring all the Soviet-made nuclear warheads on their territory to Russia.2 China and France issued separate and distinct statements regarding their security assurances in this connection.en_US
dc.format.extent34 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Budapest memorandum and Russia's Intervention in Ukraineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)en_US


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