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dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorSquires, David G.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:46:31Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:46:31Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5719
dc.descriptionCHDS State/Localen_US
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe delivery of police services has been governed by various strategic management plans. Flaws exposed in the professional model gave rise to the development of community policing (COP). Eventually, dissatisfaction with COP gave rise to Compstat. Today, Compstat is the dominant strategic model for the provision of police services in the U.S. and, has been credited with significantly improving the delivery of police services. The practical implementation of Compstat has however, exposed certain flaws, paradoxes and gaps in the model that impede crime fighting effectiveness, and diminish public trust. The threats and challenges of the twenty-first century call for the police to develop a strategic management plan that facilitates not only crime fighting but also enhances the ability to prepare for, respond to, and mitigate the harm caused in the all hazards environment. This thesis provides evidence and arguments from a body of strategic management literature, and the lessons learned from prior police management practices, to suggest an innovative adaptation of Compstat. Compstat 2.0 is a hybrid that builds on what has been shown to work best in Compstat, COP and other models while diminishing or eliminating what has been shown to be dysfunctional.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/compstatninnovat109455719
dc.format.extentxvi, 135 p. : ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrategic planningen_US
dc.subject.lcshCommunity policingen_US
dc.titleCompstat 2.0 an innovative police strategic management plan that facilitates performance in the all crimes and all hazards environmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMiller, Pat
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.identifier.oclc720645031
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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