Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMehay, Stephen L.
dc.contributor.advisorPrice, Jonathan D.
dc.contributor.authorLizarraga, Joseph M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:46:41Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:46:41Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5778
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis identifies the effects of mobilization on Marine Corps Reserve non-prior service (NPS) personnel continuation rates. The research evaluates the retention effects of reservists' expectations about mobilization by analyzing retention data from three separate time periods - Pre-9/11, Overlap-9/11, and Post-9/11. The analysis used monthly observations for NPS reserve enlisted personnel who have completed their initial 6-year obligated drilling contracts. This research analyzed the end of contract "waterfall" period, which describes the drastic drop in reserve continuation that takes place upon the completion of NPS reservists drilling obligation. Analysis was performed using multivariate models for each time period, which consider the effects of mobilization, as well as other explanatory variables for demographics, military performance, education benefits, unit type, geographic region, and unemployment rate. The effects of mobilization on continuation were found to differ depending on mobilization duration, frequency, and time period. Factors negatively influencing continuation were found to include general overseas deployment and longer mobilizations. However, the negative impacts on continuation were found to decrease or become statistically insignificant for those who enlisted after 9/11. Shorter mobilization durations were found to positively impact continuation rates.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/patternsofmarine109455778
dc.format.extentxviii, 141 p. : map. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshManagementen_US
dc.subject.lcshMultivariate analysisen_US
dc.subject.lcshPenanceen_US
dc.titlePatterns of Marine Corps Reserve continuation behavior pre- and post-9/11en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.schoolGraduate School of Business and Public Policy
dc.identifier.oclc720363791
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record