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dc.contributor.advisorBergin, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorBogard, Amanda B.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:46:49Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:46:49Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5814
dc.descriptionCHDS State/Localen_US
dc.description.abstractResearch indicates that the benefits of regionalization include optimal resource allocation and enhanced communication across jurisdictions. In this thesis, regionalization is defined as the act of the region collaboratively working across jurisdictional boundaries in a formal capacity to network, preplan and respond during incidents. The 2009 Kentucky ice storm devastated the entire state. Some counties throughout the commonwealth collaborated during the response; however, only one region out of eleven formally regionalized. Possible factors related to regionalization will be explored, such as support and understanding by leaders of the concept and the importance of networking with a variety of agencies. Networking is described as interorganizational interaction and communication. Tools from social network analysis are used to visualize networking and collaboration during the 2009 Kentucky ice storm. In addition, regionalization is discussed in the context of area command. Using a case study and interviews, this thesis investigates regionalization in Kentucky as it relates to the 2009 ice storm. Recommendations are presented for improving responses to future large-scale disasters utilizing regionalization.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/unitedwestanddiv109455814
dc.format.extentxvii, 93 p. : ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEmergency managementen_US
dc.subject.lcshKentuckyen_US
dc.subject.lcshCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.lcshNetwork analysisen_US
dc.titleUnited we stand, divided we fall : increasing response capability in Kentucky through regionalization and leadershipen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.identifier.oclc720335538
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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