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dc.contributor.advisorApte, Aruna
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, Ryan J.
dc.dateMar-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T20:08:58Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01T20:08:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58279
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited
dc.description.abstractDue to naval vessels’ unique sea and air capabilities, the United States government often calls on the Navy to provide immediate humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) to affected populations around the world. However, not all ships possess capabilities that can be adapted to the humanitarian mission, and they therefore should not be tasked with humanitarian missions. To respond quickly, it is not uncommon for combatant commanders to task the closest ships without considering if a more HADR-capable ship is available, if slightly farther away. This type of tasking can easily waste valuable U.S. resources (wartime assets, funding, manpower, and readiness) while providing a suboptimal HADR response package of ships to the affected population. In an environment of constrained resources, it is important that these resources are used as efficiently as possible when responding to disasters around the world. This study builds on prior U.S. Navy HADR research and provides decision makers with a utility-based optimization tool that accounts for and discusses the tradeoffs between vessel capability, proximity, and cost when selecting the optimal mix of sea assets for future HADR tasking.
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/autilitybasedppr1094558279
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleA utility-based approach to U.S. Naval Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) tasking
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.secondreaderBacolod, Marigee
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorhumanitarian assistance
dc.subject.authorHADR
dc.subject.authordisaster relief
dc.subject.authordisaster response
dc.subject.authorCooperative Strategy
dc.subject.authorforce allocation
dc.subject.authorhospital ship
dc.subject.authorMilitary Sealift Command
dc.subject.authorMSC
dc.subject.authorOFDA
dc.subject.authorOverseas Humanitarian Disaster Assistance and Civic Aid
dc.subject.authorOHDACA
dc.subject.authoroperating costs
dc.subject.authorships
dc.subject.authortsunami
dc.subject.authorearthquake
dc.subject.authorHaiti
dc.subject.authorJapan
dc.subject.authorTohoku
dc.subject.authorUSAID
dc.subject.authorU.S. Navy
dc.subject.authorUSN
dc.subject.authorRRF
dc.subject.authorutility
dc.subject.authorfactor analysis
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesis
dc.description.serviceCommander, United States Navy Reserve
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Management
etd.thesisdegree.levelMasters
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagement
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School
dc.identifier.thesisid29676


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