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dc.contributor.advisorShattuck, Nita Lewis
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Christine L.
dc.dateMar-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T20:09:09Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01T20:09:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58294
dc.description.abstractThis thesis seeks to determine why U.S. Navy Sailors work longer hours than accounted for in Navy manpower models. The study focuses on at-sea tasks of enlisted Sailors aboard Guided Missile Destroyers. To address the question, we reviewed the full Navy Manpower Analysis Center model for Destroyer task requirements, interviewed Destroyer subject-matter experts knowledgeable about enlisted tasking, analyzed self-reported workload questionnaires administered to deployed Sailors, developed a comprehensive enlisted at-sea task model, and contrasted that model with Navy task models. The thesis finds that, over the past 25 years, Navy policy changes have resulted in decreased Destroyer manning, insufficient training due to revised methodologies, and deficient maintenance. Relying on technological advancements to reduce workload, the Navy cut manning levels. These manning shortfalls, combined with higher operational tempos, resulted in misalignment between actual at-sea tasks and manning models. The largest misalignment occurs in training, including on-the-job training and qualifications, warfare training, and underway drills. Additionally, the study finds that Navy-wide policy changes were not vetted through OPNAV N1 to determine their effect on at-sea Sailor workload. This thesis recommends instituting centralized policy analysis for new initiatives potentially affecting Sailor workload and periodic reassessment of the Navy Availability Factor (afloat wartime workweek).
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theunresourcedbu1094558294
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleThe unresourced burden on United States Navy Sailors at sea
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.secondreaderGood, Charles
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.subject.authorNavy manpower
dc.subject.authorfleet manning
dc.subject.authorNavy training
dc.subject.authorNavy maintenance
dc.subject.authoroperational tempo
dc.subject.authorOPTEMPO
dc.subject.authorNavy Availability Factor
dc.subject.authorNAF
dc.subject.authorNavy Standard Workweek
dc.subject.authorNSWW
dc.subject.authorNavy Manpower Analysis Center
dc.subject.authorNAVMAC
dc.subject.authorworking hours
dc.subject.authorShip Manpower Document
dc.subject.authorSMD
dc.subject.authorGuided Missile Destroyer
dc.subject.authorDDG
dc.subject.authorfleet friction
dc.subject.authorreadiness gap
dc.subject.authorcommand and control
dc.subject.authorsea/shore imbalance
dc.subject.authormaritime regulations
dc.subject.authoroptimal manning
dc.subject.authorRevolution in Training
dc.subject.authorRIT
dc.subject.authorbehavior analysis workload creep
dc.subject.authorworkload imbalance
dc.subject.authortask shedding
dc.subject.authorfatigue
dc.subject.authorstress
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesis
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, USN
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Operations Research
etd.thesisdegree.levelMasters
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Research
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School
dc.identifier.thesisid28695
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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