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dc.contributor.advisorMeyskens, Covell
dc.contributor.authorJones, Stevie L., II
dc.dateMar-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T20:09:26Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01T20:09:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58318
dc.description.abstractVarious nations in the international domain speculate that China alone has enough leverage to compel North Korea into giving up its nuclear weapons. However, China claims that its influence over North Korea is limited. Although China remains North Korea’s most important ally, their relationship often has been categorized as complex and ambiguous, as both countries are driven by a shared history of succumbing to foreign aggression. Some argue that historical events led the two countries to become estranged rather than to become strong allies. Conversely, others contend that the history between China and North Korea drives both countries to maintain an enduring alliance. Therefore, this thesis answers the question: Does China alone possess enough leverage to have major influence on North Korea’s behavior? Through analysis of China and North Korea’s alliance formation, the first and second nuclear crises, and the Six Party Talks, this thesis contends that China alone does not have enough leverage to alter North Korea’s behavior because diplomatic ties are not as close as some may believe. Therefore, the international community should cooperate with China so that influence may be gained over North Korea’s behavior.
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/chinandnorthkore1094558318
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleChina and North Korea: the leverage dilemma
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.secondreaderWeiner, Robert
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorUnited States
dc.subject.authorChina
dc.subject.authorNorth Korea
dc.subject.authorleverage
dc.subject.authoralliance
dc.subject.authoralliances
dc.subject.authordenuclearization
dc.subject.authornortheast Asian security
dc.subject.authornuclear weapons
dc.subject.authorcompetition
dc.subject.authorcooperation
dc.subject.authorpeace
dc.subject.authorstability
dc.subject.authorSix Party Talks
dc.subject.authorAgreed Framework
dc.subject.authornonproliferation
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navy
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, The Pacific)
etd.thesisdegree.levelMasters
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, The Pacific)
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School
dc.identifier.thesisid29967
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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