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dc.contributor.advisorMeierding, Emily
dc.contributor.authorJustice, Daniel L.
dc.dateMar-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T20:09:27Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01T20:09:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58320
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited
dc.description.abstractGlobal climate change is rapidly melting the polar ice caps and thus opening the Arctic to human activity. Russia is particularly affected by these changes as the nation with the longest Arctic coastline and a significant portion of its gross domestic product (GDP) generated above the Arctic Circle. This thesis examines how to best classify Russia’s strategy in the pre- and post-2014 periods and concludes the strategy shows a remarkable degree of continuity given the dramatic changes that occurred that year. Contrary to arguments that Russia is militarizing the Arctic or attempting to conduct a land grab, during both periods Russia has pursued an economic calculation strategy, attempting to maintain a benign political environment while at the same time steering the Arctic energy and transport sectors for the purpose of reaping economic rewards. The continuity noted in Russia’s strategy is perplexing when examined under a rational actor model. This thesis argues that a bureaucratic politics model more accurately reflects the reality of Russia’s Arctic decision making process. The ideological beliefs of the siloviki political bloc in Russia, combined with the personal financial connections of many top politicians, has led Russia to develop and maintain its Arctic strategy.
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleRussian arctic strategy: or how I learned to stop worrying and love bureaucratic politics
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.secondreaderTsypkin, Mikhail
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorRussia
dc.subject.authorArctic
dc.subject.authoroil
dc.subject.authorhydrocarbon
dc.subject.authorNorth Pole
dc.subject.authorNorthern Sea Route
dc.subject.authorbureaucratic politics
dc.subject.authorsiloviki
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesis
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navy
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Europe and Eurasia)
etd.thesisdegree.levelMasters
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe and Eurasia)
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School
dc.identifier.thesisid29976


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