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dc.contributor.advisorMoltz, James Clay
dc.contributor.authorBoylan, Andrea K.
dc.dateMar-18
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T20:09:58Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01T20:09:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58363
dc.description.abstractScholarly literature has emphasized the role of the regional security environment in driving nuclear proliferation following the end of the Cold War. Nevertheless, few studies have examined regional nuclear dynamics. This dissertation investigates what drove proliferation trends over time in the Middle East, a conflict-ridden region. Over three time periods, representing the bipolar period (1973–1990), the unipolar period (1991–2003), and the multipolar period (2004-2013), did proliferation increase or decrease? And did system-level or regional-level factors drive the change? In contrast to mainstream arguments that nuclear proliferation was contained during the Cold War but could be expected to increase after its end, this research finds that nuclear proliferation in the Middle East increased during the Cold War period but decreased after its end. Specifically, superpower competition during the Cold War seemed to foster greater nuclear proliferation among client states. The reduction of great power competition following the end of the Cold War allowed the sole superpower, the United States, to better manage proliferation issues and strengthen existing or create new multilateral mechanisms to control these threats. In the recent, less structured multipolar environment, great powers came together to manage proliferation with their efforts bolstered by the nonproliferation regime.
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/nuclearprolifera1094558363
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.
dc.titleNuclear proliferation in the Middle East: in pursuit of a regional logic
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authornuclear proliferation
dc.subject.authorthe Middle East
dc.subject.authorregional nuclear dynamics
dc.subject.authorexternal management
dc.subject.authorsuperpower management
dc.subject.authorregional security environment
dc.subject.authorsecond nuclear age
dc.subject.authornuclear weapons
dc.subject.authorballistic missiles
dc.subject.authorfissile material
dc.subject.authornuclear warheads
dc.subject.authornuclear-weapon-free zones
dc.subject.authornuclear deterrence
dc.subject.authorsuperpower competition
dc.subject.authorEgypt
dc.subject.authorIran
dc.subject.authorIraq
dc.subject.authorLibya
dc.subject.authorSaudi Arabia
dc.subject.authorSyria
dc.subject.authorTurkey
dc.subject.authorUnited Arab Emirates
dc.description.serviceCivilian, U.S. Department of State
etd.thesisdegree.nameDoctor of Philosophy in Security Studies
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoral
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School
dc.identifier.thesisid25640
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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