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dc.contributor.advisorLavoy, Peter R.
dc.contributor.authorStebbins, Adriane A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:46:53Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:46:53Z
dc.date.issued2002-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5839
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe acquisition and modernization of chemical warfare (CW) capabilities by state and non-state actors, coupled with the vulnerability of ships restricted in maneuverability to chemical weapons attacks, makes CW defense an increased priority for the U.S. Navy. Adversaries may be deterred from using chemical weapons against naval forces if the U.S. Navy demonstrates that it can continue operations under CW conditions. In order to conduct a psychological operations campaign that will achieve the desired result, naval forces must be prepared to conduct operations in CW environments while simultaneously protecting personnel from the effects of chemical weapons. This thesis applies the principles of chemical defense outlined in Joint Publication 3-11- contamination avoidance, protection, and decontamination-to requirements for naval operations. It then compares the current doctrine, training, organization, and equipment of the U.S. Navy to the requirements generated by the Department of Defense. This thesis argues that the ability of the U.S. Navy to conduct military operations in CW environments could be improved through expanded operational doctrine, a reorganization of shipboard roles for CW defense, integrated and realistic unit training, and additional procurement of collective protection systems. Implementation of these modest recommendations can dramatically increase the CW preparedness of the U.S. Navy.en_US
dc.format.extentxviii, 59 p. : ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, Calif. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChemical warfareen_US
dc.subject.lcshChemical weaponsen_US
dc.titleCan naval surface forces operate under chemical weapons conditions?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderIatrou, Steven J.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.serviceEnsign, United States Naval Reserveen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Information Systems and Operationsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Systems and Operationsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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