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dc.contributor.advisorPorch, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorPauley, Robert E.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:46:54Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:46:54Z
dc.date.issued2001-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/5846
dc.description.abstractThis thesis assesses the potential of U.S. Naval Forward Presence in the Western Pacific to stabilize economic markets around the world in the event of a crisis in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Straits. It utilizes a scenario analogous to that of the 1995-96 Taiwan Strait crisis that it sets in the year 2005. The scenario utilizes existing military, political and economic conditions in the region to forecast likely behavior of the main actors. The thesis concludes that U.S. Naval Forward Presence is the vital ingredient to protect U.S. interests in the region, discourage crisis escalation, and stabilize world oil and financial markets.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/thecrisisofroleo109455846
dc.format.extentxvi, 47 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe crisis of 2005 - the role of U.S. Naval Forward presence in the evolution of relations between the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Chinaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.serviceUS Navy (USN) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclc267158
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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