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dc.contributor.authorDrennan, Elke
dc.date2017-03
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-13T17:10:53Z
dc.date.available2018-06-13T17:10:53Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/58930
dc.description.abstractA challenge faced by organizations globally is a workforce reluctant to use collaboration tools. Leaders invest large percentages of their budgets in information technology (IT) solutions, but often see little in return (Tirgari, 2012). The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore how employee perceptions about organizational policies that mandate the use of technology affect the acceptance, use, and perceived productivity thereof. Eighteen participants of a major IT command responded to nine open-ended interview questions. Data analysis involved open, axial, and selective coding of the participantsメ responses, which produced three major themes and 13 sub-themes. The three major themes were leadership, policy, and mandated tool. The findings from this study offer leaders a theory that proposes numerous ways to more effectively implement organizational policies that mandate the use of technology. By following the recommendations of this study, leaders can expect gains in compliance and worker productivity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNaval Postgraduate School Acquisition Research Programen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEffectively Implementing Policies That Mandate the Use of Technology—A Grounded Theory Studyen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.npsreportSYM-AM-17-055


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