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dc.contributor.advisorKartalov, Emil P.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jonathan M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-24T22:34:57Z
dc.date.available2018-08-24T22:34:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/59632
dc.description.abstractNavy divers and dive-qualified personnel are often required to operate in cold water. The threat of hypothermia and other health concerns limits the time a diver is allowed in the water. The neoprene wetsuit is the primary material used for protection in low temperature conditions. Small pockets of air within the neoprene create a thermally insulating layer of air between the diver and the ocean. As the individual descends underwater, the increase of static pressure on the wetsuit causes the protective air pockets to shrink. This sharply lowers the overall thermal resistance of the wetsuit. By replacing the insulating air pockets with rigid glass microspheres, changes in depth had significantly less negative influence on the thermal resistivity and buoyancy of the fabricated material. Resulting experimental data related thermal resistivity to volumetric fraction of microspheres in the polymer. This effort ultimately proved the superior thermal properties of the fabricated composite over neoprene and expanded future possibilities for passive thermal protection in low-temperature waters.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Researchen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/microspherebased1094559632
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMICROSPHERE-BASED PASSIVE MATERIAL FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE DIVING SUITSen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics (PH)
dc.subject.authorNavy diveren_US
dc.subject.authordive operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorNavy diving and salvageen_US
dc.subject.authorscubaen_US
dc.subject.authorscuba divingen_US
dc.subject.authorscuba diveren_US
dc.subject.authorthermal resistivityen_US
dc.subject.authorheat lossen_US
dc.subject.authorwetsuiten_US
dc.subject.authormicrosphereen_US
dc.subject.authorneopreneen_US
dc.subject.authorice divingen_US
dc.subject.authorArctic divingen_US
dc.subject.authorArctic scubaen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid29922
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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