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dc.contributor.advisorAbenheim, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorYost, David S.
dc.contributor.authorDrones, Albert J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-24T22:35:10Z
dc.date.available2018-08-24T22:35:10Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/59649
dc.description.abstractThe NATO Allies agreed at the September 2014 Wales Summit to spend at least two percent of their gross domestic products (GDPs) on defense by 2024. This commitment has become a point of contention among the Allies and a distraction from the imperative of improving the Alliance’s burden sharing system. The GDP-based burden sharing policy has not proven to be effective or fair, and its implementation has been subject to national political and economic constraints. NATO as a whole has struggled to sufficiently fund the capabilities necessary for its mission effectiveness, even as individual Allies (above all, the United States) have spent enormous amounts on defense. At the same time, some Allies have made significant security contributions—e.g., basing facilities and aid for migrants—that have not shown up in their defense budgets. The disputes over burden sharing have divided the Allies and threatened to further undermine their consensus. U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis has proposed an approach to burden sharing that would tailor defense spending plans to the unique contributions of individual Allies and focus on strengthening the Alliance’s cohesion and effectiveness.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/gdpbasedburdensh1094559649
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleGDP-BASED BURDEN SHARING IN NATO: THE POLITICS OF DEFENSE FINANCINGen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorburden sharingen_US
dc.subject.authorNATOen_US
dc.subject.authortwo percenten_US
dc.subject.authorGDPen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Europe and Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe and Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid30197
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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