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dc.contributor.advisorAgrawal, Brij
dc.contributor.advisorEuler, Ed
dc.dateSpring Quater, 1993
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-25T23:36:14Z
dc.date.available2018-09-25T23:36:14Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.otherNASA-CR-195512
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/60028
dc.descriptionDesign Project for AE 4871en_US
dc.description.abstractTHE PROJECT: This project was completed as part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The intent of the course is to provide experience in the design of all the major components in a spacecraft system. Team members were given responsibility for the design of one of the six primary subsystems: power, structures, propulsion, attitude control, TT&C, and thermal control. In addition, a single member worked on configuration control, launch vehicle integration, and a spacecraft test plan. Given an eleven week time constraint, a preliminary design of each subsystem was completed. Where possible, possible component selections were also made. Assisted for this project came principally from the Naval Research Laboratory's Spacecraft Technology Branch. Specific information on components was solicited from representatives in industry. The design project centers on a general purpose satellite bus that is currently being sought by the Strategic Defense Initiative. REQUIREMENT:To support low earth orbit experiments, the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) has established the requirement for a general purpose spacecraft bus. The overall goal is to procure a small satellite to which experiments could be "bolted" and then launched and flown inexpensively. A minimal set of strawman requirements were established by SDI and are listed in Table 1.1. These specifications are intentionally broad, allowing the spacecraft design team to select its own best method for engineering the bus. To limit the scope of the project, the NPS team elected to design for only one launch vehicle, the Pegasus, rather than considering all possible LVs. Consequently, while the Scout, Scout derivatives (e.g., the Orbital Express) and larger vehicles may be capable of carrying the bus, building in compatibility for these other rockets was not a factor. Additiona11y, to support low cost procurement, only commercial off the shelf technology was used.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNaval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleNPS Alternate Techsat Satelliteen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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