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dc.contributor.authorLee, Tongli Lim
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Ryan A.
dc.contributor.authorLuhrs, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorArora, Anjela
dc.contributor.authorPol, Vilas G.
dc.contributor.authorWu, Chun-Hsien
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jonathan
dc.contributor.otherEnergy Academic Group
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T19:21:16Z
dc.date.available2018-09-28T19:21:16Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationLee, Tongli Lim, et al. "High-stability tin/carbon battery electrodes produced using reduction expansion synthesis." Carbon 132 (2018): 411-419.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/60169
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2018.02.079
dc.description.abstractThis study shows high stability Sn (10wt %)/carbon Li-ion battery anodes can be made via the Reduction Expansion Synthesis (RES) process. Hybrid Sn/C anodes had an initial capacity of 425 mAh g-1 which stabilized to ~340 mAh g-1 after less than 10 cycles. Unlike earlier Sn/C anodes, capacity remained virtually constant for more than 180 additional cycles. Neat carbon independently tested for Li capacity had a steady specific capacity of 280 mAh g-1. The difference detected between the pure carbon and Sn/C cases are consistent with Sn having the theoretical capacity of ~1000mAh g-1. The high stability of the RES derived anodes, relative to earlier Sn based electrodes, is postulated to exist because RES synthesis enables the formation of direct, strong bond between Sn and carbon substrate atoms, hence reducing the rate of Sn electrode disintegration and capacity fade due to expansion upon lithiation. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are consistent with this postulate as both show an initial Sn particles size of only a few nanometers and minimal growth after cycling. Reduced interface resistance is also indicative of unique Sn-carbon bond.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Researchen_US
dc.format.extent9 p.
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleHigh-stability tin/carbon battery electrodes produced using reduction expansion synthesisen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)en_US
dc.description.funderPurdue Center for Power and Energy Research provided under grant number N00014-15-1-2833en_US


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